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Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management, 2012, 2(2), 78-87

 

Production Resource Management in the Industrialised House-Building Supply Chain

 

Martin Lennartsson1 and Anders Björnfot2

1PhD Student, Division of Structural and Construction Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden, E-mail: marlen@ltu.se (corresponding author).

2Assistant Professor, Faculty of Technology, Economy and Management, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway, E-mail: anders.bjornfot@hig.no

 

Production Management

 

Received November 7, 2011; received revision January 19, 2012; accepted February 2, 2012

 

Available online February 27, 2012

 

Abstract: Industrialised house-building suppliers must learn to see how the lack of resource management disrupt the synchronisation of their production processes both upstream (e.g. capability to forecast material consumption) and downstream (e.g. order delivery Just-in-Time). In contrast to focus on workflow as is more common in construction, Systematic Production Analysis (SPA) is a tool capable of providing a more robust production process in terms of better resource characterisation and predictability. A roadmap model, composed of six steps, has been developed for simple introduction of SPA. The model is a straightforward way of classifying the production system in terms of impacting resource and parameters attributing to production loss (scrap or downtime). The applicability of SPA is analysed through a pilot case study at a patio door manufacturer. Two main response parameters emerged related to scrap; surface and dimension errors of the work piece material (wood). An objective function was formulated to reduce the scrap without increasing the total cost of the work piece material. It was suggested that the case company evaluates Engineering Wood Products (EWP) leading to a more robust production process (less scrap), but in turn increasing the initial cost of the work piece material. Other potential measures are purchasing new processing tools, investing in new machinery or educating workers which all, directly or indirectly, lead to reduced scrap. Consequently, proper management of production resources will improve their predictability and in turn improve production control.

Keywords: Industrialised house-building, Production system, Robustness, Supply Chain Management, Systematic Production Analysis.

Copyright © Association of Engineering, Project, and Production Management (EPPM-Association).

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Requests for reprints and permissions at eppm.journal@gmail.com.

Citation: Lennartsson, M. and Björnfot, A. (2012). Production Resource Management in the Industrialised House-Building Supply Chain. Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management, 2(2), 78-87. DOI: 10.32738/JEPPM.201207.0004

DOI: 10.32738/JEPPM.201207.0004

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